whoiusedtobe:

nevver:

Cross-stitched Microbes

E. coli rarely form flagellae

The flu virus is round, not bean-shaped

Yeast grow a single bud at a time

Microbiology might be cute, but it’s cuter when you get it right.

Hi! Thanks for your note. I’m the stitcher who patterns and stitches these microbes, most often with input and images sent to me by scientists, medical professionals, lab techs, or pretty much anyone interested in microbiology. I’m not a scientist myself, but I do base my patterns on the microscopic images that are available to me, and I rely on experts to point out inaccuracies…while also trying to make sure that the microbes I stitch are unique and different enough from each other to be both recognizable and artistically interesting. (And sure, cute.)

Sometimes that means stitching the slightly more rare versions of microbes, I guess. So I’m not too worried about E. Coli rarely growing flagellae — particularly since I also stitch an E. Coli FTSZ-ring cross stitch, here: https://www.etsy.com/listing/113037127/e-coli-ftsz-ring-microbe-germ-cross

…which was commissioned by a customer whose father spent 20+ years studying E. Coli. She also gave him the one you see in this photoset as a gift.

Here’s the image I used for the original E. Coli: http://a.tgcdn.net/images/products/additional/carousel/bacteria-ecoli.jpg

This was the flu image I used to pattern and stitch the influenza virus you’re seeing here (also where the bird flu pattern came from): http://textbookofbacteriology.net/themicrobialworld/Influenza.html

Here’s the image I based the beer yeast on: http://blog.oregonlive.com/thebeerhere/2008/09/large_yeast.jpg

I freely admit that I picked the microbe from each photo that was most visually interesting and unique to my unscientific, crafter’s eye. If it helps, you might think of my work as less an indicator of the typical appearance of the average microbe for its type and more an artistic interpretation of some of the smaller ends of the bell curves of “what things really look like.” Just as you wouldn’t expect a painter to only paint the platonic ideal of a tree and complain if there were too many branches on the one she chose to paint instead, I’m not sure it’s fair to expect me to hold myself to a higher standard of normalcy than nature appears to.

These are more a set of thoughts on feminism, craft, science, germs, microscopic life and modern society, than they are a science textbook.

But if my interpretations of the images I’m sharing here are flawed, I welcome correction.

nevver:

Cross-stitched Microbes

Black Plague — if you’re looking for Yersinia Pestis, you won’t find it finished (yet) in my shop today, but I did pattern it in the second set of microbes that I patterned. If you’d like me to stitch it up for you, just let me know! I’ll add it to the shop.

If you’re a stitcher and the pattern would suffice, here’s the 10-microbe pattern set with the plague in it: https://www.etsy.com/listing/111638813/cross-stitch-pattern-common-microbes-set

And here’s a listing for 50 mini microbe patterns (also including the plague) plus a sampler of the life cycle of plasmodium falciparum malaria thrown in there: https://www.etsy.com/listing/182471178/cross-stitch-patterns-50-microbes-in-5

:)

myhsvlife:

wattyswallstuff:

myhsvlife:

etsy:

Alicia Watkins’ embroidered microbes.

But streptococcus is a chain of circles. ):

Thanks for the note! I’m not a microbiologist (just a cross stitcher, with a M.A. in watching TV), so here’s the photo I based the strep pattern on: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Streptococcus_pyogenes.jpg

As a stitcher, I could have patterned/stitched French knots rather than full cross stitches, which would have made it clearer that they’re chains of circles rather than little X’s, which is obviously what a full cross stitch looks like. (Anyone who gets the patterns from my shop is welcome to make that change when they’re stitching for themselves. Another change that might make it look a little more accurate is outlining each cross stitch (which would make them look like squares, but that’s probably better than X’s). I tried the outlining route but decided it looked worse, at least to me.)

In my case, I went for the regular cross stitches in part so that it would be easier to see the stitching, and in part to create a pattern that would be easier for a beginning stitcher to cope with (because French knots are a pain in the butt, and most of the other microbe patterns are already inaccessibly difficult for a beginning stitcher).

Those aren’t scientific reasons, so I get how the decision could be annoying, especially in light of how I try to use real images for patterning microbes and tiny things. There are better, more scientifically accurate stitch types that could have been used there, and I encourage everybody to try them out!

I hope you didn’t think I was calling you out! I totally love the whole cross stitch series, and it’s of course always your right for artistic freedom. I was honestly just confused that maybe I had somehow learned it wrong.

Any way, keep doing awesome things like this. You’re definitely talented and these are cute as can be while also being educational!

No, no worries! Your point was one that I thought should be highlighted (FOR SCIENCE!).

And it seemed like a good opportunity to write a bit about patterning and the kinds of decisions that go into that process (for me), which is something I like to do and that I hope might be interesting or helpful to fellow stitchers and patterners…even if my reasons sometimes boil down to very practical issues rather than artistic or scientific ones. :)

amsplendor:

etsy:

Alicia Watkins’ embroidered microbes.

PRIONS ARE NOT MICROBES THAT BOTHERS ME.

Thanks for the note — I’ve updated the mad cow cross stitch listing so that the part that refers to microbes says explicitly that a prion is not a microbe. I’ll do the same if I ever get around to finally stitching FFI. (Even my regular-type insomnia doesn’t give me enough time to get to *everything* I want to do…)

Unfortunately, there’s no way to add the more all-encompassing word “pathogen” to my Etsy shop section, because shop section titles just aren’t allowed to be that long. I could change it completely, but I think “Microbes and Germs” is more immediately recognizable to most people than if I called the section “Pathogens and Cells” (for instance). That part’s just going to remain bothersome for now, I’m afraid.

Perhaps you’ll feel better about the whole thing knowing the shop section used to be called (even more inaccurately) “Germs and Bugs,” and it had an Anopheles mosquito in it along with viruses and bacteria. (Right?? Puns!!)

myhsvlife:

etsy:

Alicia Watkins’ embroidered microbes.

But streptococcus is a chain of circles. ):

Thanks for the note! I’m not a microbiologist (just a cross stitcher, with a M.A. in watching TV), so here’s the photo I based the strep pattern on: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Streptococcus_pyogenes.jpg

As a stitcher, I could have patterned/stitched French knots rather than full cross stitches, which would have made it clearer that they’re chains of circles rather than little X’s, which is obviously what a full cross stitch looks like. (Anyone who gets the patterns from my shop is welcome to make that change when they’re stitching for themselves. Another change that might make it look a little more accurate is outlining each cross stitch (which would make them look like squares, but that’s probably better than X’s). I tried the outlining route but decided it looked worse, at least to me.)

In my case, I went for the regular cross stitches in part so that it would be easier to see the stitching, and in part to create a pattern that would be easier for a beginning stitcher to cope with (because French knots are a pain in the butt, and most of the other microbe patterns are already inaccessibly difficult for a beginning stitcher).

Those aren’t scientific reasons, so I get how the decision could be annoying, especially in light of how I try to use real images for patterning microbes and tiny things. There are better, more scientifically accurate stitch types that could have been used there, and I encourage everybody to try them out!

Smallpox!Finished: https://www.etsy.com/listing/176897004/smallpox-cross-stitch-geek-stitchery-forPatterns: https://www.etsy.com/listing/163241952/cross-stitch-pattern-common-microbes-set
I used to be a Donatello, but now I’m really more of a Raphael.Get a finished one here: https://www.etsy.com/listing/182567651/turtle-cross-stitch-pick-one-miniGet the patterns here: https://www.etsy.com/listing/112075053/cross-stitch-patterns-4-mini-patterns-of

I used to be a Donatello, but now I’m really more of a Raphael.

Get a finished one here: https://www.etsy.com/listing/182567651/turtle-cross-stitch-pick-one-mini

Get the patterns here: https://www.etsy.com/listing/112075053/cross-stitch-patterns-4-mini-patterns-of

artandsciencejournal:

Cross-Stitching Science!

Alicia Watkins of Watty’s Wall Stuff makes these awesome microbe cross-stitches that I just had to share! You can either get them from her, or buy her patterns and make your own. 

Click here to check out the Microbe section.

They are so fun to stitch — and I’m always adding more, so if you don’t see your favorite germ/microbe, let me know (send/link to a microscopic image if possible) and I’ll add it to the patterning queue! :)

DOZENS!
https://www.etsy.com/listing/179622658/dozens-of-us-cross-stitch-inspired-funny